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Benjamin Franklin
Benjamin Franklin
17.1. 1706, Boston – 17.4. 1790 Philadelphia; Buchdrucker, Journalist, Verleger, Erfinder, Staatsmann, Naturwissenschaftler und Schriftsteller – franklin Rezension: The Autobiography
Most people dislike vanity in others, whatever share they have of it themselves; but I give it fair quarter wherever I meet with it, being persuaded that it is often productive of good to the possessor, and to others that are within his sphere of action; and therefore, in many cases, it would not be altogether absurd if a man were to thank God for his vanity among the other comforts of life.
The Autobiography, S.7
From a child I was fond of reading, and all the little money that came ino my hands was ever laid out in books. The Autobiography, S.16
This library afforded me the means of improvement by constant study, for which I set apart an hour or two each day, and thus repair'd in some degree the loss of the learned education my father once intended for me. Reading was the only amusement I allow'd myself. I spent no time in taverns, games, or frolicks of any kind; and my industry in my business continu'd as indefatigable as it was necessary.
The Autobiography, S.89
Human felicity is produc‘d not so much by great pieces of good fortune that seldom happen, as by little advantages that occur every day. Thus, if you teach a poor young man to shave himself, and keep his razor in order, you may contribute more to the happiness of his life than in giving him a thousand guineas. The money may be soon spent, the regret only remaining of having foolishly consumed it; but in the other case, he escapes the frequent vexation of waiting for barbers, and of their sometimes dirty fingers, offensive breaths, and dull razors; he shaves when most convenient to him, and enjoys daily the pleasure of its being done with a good instrument. The Autobiography, S.145
"There never was a good war, or a bad peace" Letter to Josiah Quincy
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." Historical Review of Pennsylvania. 1759
This sentence was much used in the Revolutionary period. It occurs even so early as November, 1755, in an answer by the Assembly of Pennsylvania to the Governor, and forms the motto of Franklin’s “Historical Review,” 1759, appearing also in the body of the work.—Frothingham: Rise of the Republic of the United States, p. 413.
 

Benjamin Franklin
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© by Herbert Huber, Am Fröschlanger 15, 83512 Wasserburg, Germany, 24.3.2004